The Date of the Exodus, Part 2 (The Covenant & the Cross #70)

Exodus 14:29-31 which reads: “the children of Israel walked upon dry land in the midst of the sea; and the waters were a wall unto them on their right hand, and on their left. Thus the Lord saved Israel that day out of the hand of the Egyptians; and Israel saw the Egyptians dead upon the sea shore. And Israel saw that great work which the Lord did upon the Egyptians: and the people feared the Lord, and believed the Lord, and his servant Moses.”

Today’s quote about the Bible is from Phillips Brooks. He said: “Christ is the Word of God. It is not in certain texts written in the New Testament, valuable as they are; it is not in certain words which Jesus spoke, vast as is their preciousness; it is in the Word, which Jesus is, that the great manifestation of God is made.”

Our topic for today is titled “The Date of the Exodus (Part 2)” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

Today, we are going to look at the second study regarding the issue of the date of the Exodus.

STUDY 2: MERNEPTAH’S STELE

The conclusion regarding the date of the Exodus that has been reached from deciphering languages has created problems. One of the most serious difficulties was the discovery of an inscription called the Merneptah stele. On this stone document, Mer-nep-tah (the son of Rameses) claims a victory over Israel in the land of Canaan, showing that during his reign Israel was already in the land of Canaan: “Israel is laid waste, his seed is not.” Thus, Merneptah could not have been the pharaoh of the Exodus, for that identification does not leave room for the Exodus, the forty years in the desert, and the five to ten years of conquest during his reign. For this reason, many scholars have suggested that the pharaoh Moses met on his return to Egypt was Rameses, the same one from whom he had fled about forty years earlier.

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