Just Looking for a Home, Part 4 (The Covenant & the Cross #85)


Today’s passage of Scripture is Numbers 13:17-20 which reads: “And Moses sent them to spy out the land of Canaan, and said unto them, Get you up this way southward, and go up into the mountain: And see the land, what it is, and the people that dwelleth therein, whether they be strong or weak, few or many; And what the land is that they dwell in, whether it be good or bad; and what cities they be that they dwell in, whether in tents, or in strong holds; And what the land is, whether it be fat or lean, whether there be wood therein, or not. And be ye of good courage, and bring of the fruit of the land.”

Today’s Covenant & the Cross quote about the Bible is from Dietrich Bonhoeffer. He said: “The deceit, the lie of the devil consists of this that he wishes to make man believe that he can live without God’s Word. Thus he dangles before man’s fantasy a kingdom of faith, of power, and of peace, into which only he can enter who consents to the temptations; and conceals from men that he, as the devil, is the most unfortunate and unhappy of beings, since he is finally and eternally rejected by God.”

Our topic for today is titled “Just Looking for a Home (Part 4)” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

God now directed Moses to begin the march to the land that had been promised. It had been more than four hundred years since the ancestors of the people had gone down to Egypt, and they were finally fulfilling the promise made to Abraham in Genesis 15.5 The direction of the march seems to have been almost due north—the most direct route into the land.

We might think that the people, after a year of sitting at Sinai, would have been excited to advance under the promises of God. Not everyone was enthusiastic, however. Very quickly many, if not most, of the people began to murmur and complain about the manna’ Moses became despondent about the whole situation and took his complaints to God. God provided help in leadership and quail for the people. But because of their greed, God also sent a plague on the people, killing an unknown number.

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Just Looking for a Home, Part 3 (The Covenant & the Cross #84)


Today’s passage of Scripture is Numbers 12:1-3 which reads: “And Miriam and Aaron spake against Moses because of the Ethiopian woman whom he had married: for he had married an Ethiopian woman. And they said, Hath the Lord indeed spoken only by Moses? hath he not spoken also by us? And the Lord heard it. (Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men which were upon the face of the earth.)”

Today’s Covenant & the Cross quote about the Bible is from John Adams in a letter to his son. He said: “I have myself for many years made it a practice to read through the Bible once every year. I have always endeavored to read it with the same spirit and temper of mind which I now recommend to you; that is, with the intention and desire that it contribute to my advancement in wisdom and virtue… My custom is, to read four or five chapters every morning, immediately after rising from my bed. It employs about an hour of my time, and seems to me the most suitable manner of beginning the day.”

Our topic for today is titled “Just Looking for a Home (Part 3)” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

Before we continue with the main narrative of the book of Numbers and this period in the Israelites’ journey through the wilderness, let’s deal with three “sidebar” issues that occur in the text.

1. THE NAZIRITE VOW

The term Nazirite comes from a Hebrew verb meaning “to consecrate” or “to separate.” The Nazirite normally made a vow or promise associated with a request from God. There is no reason given for the specific requirements on the part of the Nazirite. An example of this type of vow is the case of Hannah, mother of Samuel. While most vows lasted for a limited period of time, some Nazirites were under life-time vows, including Samson, Samuel, and John the Baptist. A noted New Testament example of a person taking short-term vows is the apostle Paul.

Just Looking for a Home, Part 2 (The Covenant & the Cross #83)


Today’s passage of Scripture is Numbers 1:1-3 which reads: “And the Lord spake unto Moses in the wilderness of Sinai, in the tabernacle of the congregation, on the first day of the second month, in the second year after they were come out of the land of Egypt, saying, Take ye the sum of all the congregation of the children of Israel, after their families, by the house of their fathers, with the number of their names, every male by their polls; From twenty years old and upward, all that are able to go forth to war in Israel: thou and Aaron shall number them by their armies.”

Today’s Covenant & the Cross quote about the Bible is from St. Jerome. He said: “I beg of you, my dear brother, to live among the Scriptures, to meditate upon them, to know nothing else, to seek nothing else.”

Our topic for today is titled “Just Looking for a Home (Part 2)” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

TAKING STOCK OF THE PEOPLE

The first census, at the beginning of Numbers, was directed by God. It served not only to count the people but also to organize them. The census went one step further when it numbered the tribe of Levi, which was not given an inheritance among the twelve tribes but was to be a tribe of priests. Actually, as the text points out, the tribe of Levi was also the substitute for the firstborn of the rest of the nation. This description refers back to the first Passover, when the firstborn of the Israelites were spared as the death angel passed through the land of Egypt. Now God asked for a reckoning by the substitution of the Levites for the firstborn. Thus, the men of Levi who were one month old and older were numbered. This number fell short of all the firstborn of Israel by 273, who were then “ransomed” by the payment of five shekels each. The Levites were also divided into family groups for purposes of assigning the jobs of ministry.

Beyond this, the sacred nature of the national mission was emphasized by further explication of the high standards God expected. This section seems to be preparing the nation for the first celebration of the Passover after the Exodus, commemorating one year of freedom from Egypt.

Just Looking for a Home, Part 1 (The Covenant & the Cross #82)


Numbers 33:1-2: “These are the journeys of the children of Israel, which went forth out of the land of Egypt with their armies under the hand of Moses and Aaron. And Moses wrote their goings out according to their journeys by the commandment of the Lord: and these are their journeys according to their goings out.”

Today’s Covenant & the Cross quote about the Bible is from Andrew Murray. He said: “A readiness to believe every promise implicitly, to obey every command unhesitatingly, to stand perfect and complete in all the will of God, is the only true spirit of Bible study.”

Our topic for today is titled “Just Looking for a Home (Part 1)” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

After organizing the nation for a year, God told Moses to count the people in preparation for the move to the land He had promised. This event opens the book of Numbers, and this is often about as far as we get into the book. The numbers get tedious, and there seems to be little purpose to them. For the original audience, however, these lists served as an organizing structure. The figures given are supposed to be the number of men who were able to go to war, and they reflect major military fighting units. The census would also provide a basis on which to divide the land. The nation was organized around the twelve tribes. We have already observed how this was a mixed company. Apparently, then, those who had been outsiders were now “adopted” into specific tribes, and their families would be counted as part of those tribes from here on out.

The census also helped impress the original audience with the great work of God’s sustenance. While it is possible that some of the people planted gardens during the long stay at Sinai, the text clearly points out that the primary source of food for the entire people was from God’s provision of the manna. At this point, they were not aware that they would be eating it for almost forty years, but the fact that God had been faithful for the previous year would have been encouraging. Another purpose of the census would be to validate God’s sustaining for the entire forty-year period of wandering, but that would not be seen until after the period was over and a second census showed how the nation had maintained its strength. This final purpose, however, would be one of the key points for later generations, including ours.