Just Looking for a Home, Part 1 (The Covenant & the Cross #82)


Numbers 33:1-2: “These are the journeys of the children of Israel, which went forth out of the land of Egypt with their armies under the hand of Moses and Aaron. And Moses wrote their goings out according to their journeys by the commandment of the Lord: and these are their journeys according to their goings out.”

Today’s Covenant & the Cross quote about the Bible is from Andrew Murray. He said: “A readiness to believe every promise implicitly, to obey every command unhesitatingly, to stand perfect and complete in all the will of God, is the only true spirit of Bible study.”

Our topic for today is titled “Just Looking for a Home (Part 1)” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

After organizing the nation for a year, God told Moses to count the people in preparation for the move to the land He had promised. This event opens the book of Numbers, and this is often about as far as we get into the book. The numbers get tedious, and there seems to be little purpose to them. For the original audience, however, these lists served as an organizing structure. The figures given are supposed to be the number of men who were able to go to war, and they reflect major military fighting units. The census would also provide a basis on which to divide the land. The nation was organized around the twelve tribes. We have already observed how this was a mixed company. Apparently, then, those who had been outsiders were now “adopted” into specific tribes, and their families would be counted as part of those tribes from here on out.

The census also helped impress the original audience with the great work of God’s sustenance. While it is possible that some of the people planted gardens during the long stay at Sinai, the text clearly points out that the primary source of food for the entire people was from God’s provision of the manna. At this point, they were not aware that they would be eating it for almost forty years, but the fact that God had been faithful for the previous year would have been encouraging. Another purpose of the census would be to validate God’s sustaining for the entire forty-year period of wandering, but that would not be seen until after the period was over and a second census showed how the nation had maintained its strength. This final purpose, however, would be one of the key points for later generations, including ours.

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Making a Nation Out of a Mob, Part 9 (The Covenant & the Cross #81)


Deuteronomy 16:13-17: “Thou shalt observe the feast of tabernacles seven days, after that thou hast gathered in thy corn and thy wine: And thou shalt rejoice in thy feast, thou, and thy son, and thy daughter, and thy manservant, and thy maidservant, and the Levite, the stranger, and the fatherless, and the widow, that are within thy gates. Seven days shalt thou keep a solemn feast unto the Lord thy God in the place which the Lord shall choose: because the Lord thy God shall bless thee in all thine increase, and in all the works of thine hands, therefore thou shalt surely rejoice.”

Today’s Covenant & the Cross quote about the Bible is from A.W. Tozer. He said: “The Word of God well understood and religiously obeyed is the shortest route to spiritual perfection. And we must not select a few favorite passages to the exclusion of others. Nothing less than a whole Bible can make a whole Christian.”

Our topic for today is titled “Making a Nation Out of a Mob (Part 9)” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

— Pentecost

The second festival that all the people were to attend was the Feast of Ingathering, celebrated on the fiftieth day after the offering of the sheaf at Passover. It is also known by other names, such as the Feast of Weeks and Pentecost (a later term derived from the Greek word for “fifty”). This feast took place when the harvest began, and the people brought symbolic loaves of bread (made with leaven) to present to God as a thanksgiving for the harvest. Later this festival was associated with the founding of the church.

— Tabernacles

The third festival at which the people were to gather was called Tabernacles or Booths. This festival was to remind the people of the period they spent in the desert. They were to live in a booth for one week It was to be a period of no work, so it would be a great social time.