The Passover Event (The Covenant & the Cross #66) #VA4

Today’s passage of Scripture is Exodus 12:5-7 which reads: “Your lamb shall be without blemish, a male of the first year: ye shall take it out from the sheep, or from the goats: And ye shall keep it up until the fourteenth day of the same month: and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it in the evening. And they shall take of the blood, and strike it on the two side posts and on the upper door post of the houses, wherein they shall eat it.”

Today’s quote about the Bible is from Michael Horton. He said: “To preach the Bible as ‘the handbook for life,’ or as the answer to every question, rather than as the revelation of Christ, is to turn the Bible into an entirely different book. This is how the Pharisees approached Scripture, as we can see clearly from the questions they asked Jesus. For the Pharisees, the Scriptures were a source of trivia for life’s dilemmas.”

Our topic for today is titled “The Passover Event” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

The last “plague” is given special attention because it was so much more than just a plague. Rather, it was the foundation for a ritual that would become the religious foundation of Israel to this day. God told Moses that after this event, Pharaoh would let the people go. In preparation of this freedom, the people were to perform a ritual, which was then to be repeated annually as a reminder of God’s work on behalf of His people.

The first Passover event began with the selection of a lamb. It was to be chosen on the tenth of the month of Nisan, the lunar month that begins the religious year for Israel. This lamb was to have no defects and might be either a sheep or a goat.

Each family was to select a lamb unless the family was too small, in which case several neighbors were to share one. The reason is that there were to be no leftovers after it was cooked. The lamb was to be kept until the fourteenth day of the month of Nisan (the night of the full moon). At twilight the head of the family was to kill the lamb and save its blood. Some of the blood was to be painted on the door posts and lintel of the house. The lamb was then to be roasted whole (insuring that no bones were broken). With the lamb, the people were to eat bitter herbs. As God laid out this ritual, He made clear that it was to be performed annually to remind the people of their deliverance from Egypt. Each member of the family was to be fully dressed and prepared for a journey as he or she ate. Previously, the Israelites had been told to request gold, silver, and jewelry from the Egyptians. Through God’s intervention, the Egyptians acceded to the request. While we are not told specifically, we can safely assume that the Israelites were also all packed and ready for a rapid flight from Egypt.

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The Confrontation with Pharaoh (The Covenant & the Cross #65)

Today’s passage of Scripture is Exodus 5:1-3 which reads: “And afterward Moses and Aaron went in, and told Pharaoh, Thus saith the Lord God of Israel, Let my people go, that they may hold a feast unto me in the wilderness. And Pharaoh said, Who is the Lord, that I should obey his voice to let Israel go? I know not the Lord, neither will I let Israel go. And they said, The God of the Hebrews hath met with us: let us go, we pray thee, three days’ journey into the desert, and sacrifice unto the Lord our God; lest he fall upon us with pestilence, or with the sword.”

Today’s quote about the Bible is from Geddes MacGregor, author of “A Literary History of the Bible”. He said: “When a veil there must be, the translator’s task is to make it as gossamer-fine a veil as may be. Indeed, the face of even the most beautiful of women may be enhanced by a veil, if only the veil be worthy of her beauty.”

Our topic for today is titled “The Confrontation with Pharaoh” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

In addition to the sign of the return to Mount Sinai, God gave Moses several other signs to establish his position before both the people and Pharaoh. He was able to stick his hand inside his robe and have it come out leprous and then reverse the process. He was able also to cast down his staff and have it convert to a large snake and then revert back when he picked it up.

With this, Moses began a series of confrontations with Pharaoh. We know them as the ten plagues. The plague sequence struck a serious blow to the entire agricultural cycle of Egypt, which we have seen began with the rise of Sothis (Sirius) in June, signaling the coming flood of the Nile, and culminated the following spring at the time of the first Passover.

As such, the plagues were also directed at the gods of Egypt, whose role was to ensure the agricultural prosperity of the country. However, matching specific plagues with specific gods is very difficult. Many of the gods were local in nature; thus multiple gods had multiple functions, and several merged over the centuries. It is interesting to note that the first four plagues harassed rather than produced serious long-term consequences. It was only after Pharaoh continued to resist that the plagues progressed from being a show of force to having serious consequences.