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This podcast is designed to help you better understand the Word of God — both the Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament is the story of the Covenant which God made with His chosen people Israel. And the New Testament is the story of the Cross which signifies the fulfillment of the Old Covenant with Israel and the formation of a New Covenant with redeemed people from many nations.

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The Best of Times, the Worst of Times, Part 4 (Covenant and the Cross #111)

Welcome to the Covenant and the Cross Podcast. This is episode #111. I am your host, Daniel Whyte III, president of Gospel Light Society International. This podcast is designed to help you better understand the Word of God — both the Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament is the story of the Covenant which God made with His chosen people Israel. And the New Testament is the story of the Cross which signifies the fulfillment of the Old Covenant with Israel and the formation of a New Covenant with redeemed people from many nations.

We always like to start out with the Word of God, and today’s passage of Scripture is from Joshua 6:1-5 which reads: “Now Jericho was straitly shut up because of the children of Israel: none went out, and none came in. And the Lord said unto Joshua, See, I have given into thine hand Jericho, and the king thereof, and the mighty men of valour. And ye shall compass the city, all ye men of war, and go round about the city once. Thus shalt thou do six days. And seven priests shall bear before the ark seven trumpets of rams’ horns: and the seventh day ye shall compass the city seven times, and the priests shall blow with the trumpets. And it shall come to pass, that when they make a long blast with the ram’s horn, and when ye hear the sound of the trumpet, all the people shall shout with a great shout; and the wall of the city shall fall down flat, and the people shall ascend up every man straight before him.”

Regarding this passage, Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown wrote in their commentary: “This first verse is a parenthesis introduced to prepare the way for the directions given by the Captain of the Lord’s host. The language intimates that a purpose already formed was about to be carried into immediate execution; and that, although the king and inhabitants of Jericho were fierce and experienced warriors, who would make a stout and determined resistance, the Lord promised a certain and easy victory over them. Directions are here given as to the mode of procedure. Hebrew, “horns of jubilee”; that is, the bent or crooked trumpets with which the jubilee was proclaimed. It is probable that the horns of this animal were used at first; and that afterwards, when metallic trumpets were introduced, the primitive name, as well as form of them, was traditionally continued. The design of this whole proceeding was obviously to impress the Canaanites with a sense of the divine omnipotence, to teach the Israelites a memorable lesson of faith and confidence in God’s promises, and to inspire sentiments of respect and reverence for the ark as the symbol of His presence. The length of time during which those circuits were made tended the more intensely to arrest the attention, and to deepen the impressions, both of the Israelites and the enemy. The number seven was among the Israelites the symbolic seal of the covenant between God and their nation.”

Today’s quote about the Bible is from John Quincy Adams. He said: “So great is my veneration for the Bible, that the earlier my children begin to read it the more confident will be my hopes that they will prove useful citizens to their country and respectable members of society.”

Our topic for today is titled “The Best of Times, the Worst of Times, Part 4” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

The process began early. Because of the apostasy of the people, God allowed Cushan-Rishathaim (kuh-shan rish-a-thaim) from Mesopotamia (me-so-po-ta-mi-a) to move in and oppress the people. After eight years, the people began to cry out to God. In response God raised up for them the first judge, Othniel, (oth-ni-el) the nephew of Caleb who had won Caleb’s daughter by conquering the city of Debir, formerly called Kiriath Sepher (ki-ri-ath sef-ir). Through God’s Spirit, Othniel (oth-ni-el) led the uprising, and the Israelites were able to win deliverance. As a result, there was peace for forty years.

Then the cycle began again. The Israelites again “did evil.” This time God’s instrument was King Eglon of Moab, who was allied with the Ammonites and the Amalekites. Interestingly, we find that he occupied Jericho (“the City of Palms”).2 After eighteen years, the people cried out to God, and He raised up Ehud to be judge. Using his left-handedness, Ehud was able to smuggle a sword into a meeting with Eglon and kill him. Ehud then escaped and sounded the alarm to gather the Israelite troops. Taking advantage of the loss of the Moabite king, the Israelites drove out their oppressors. Here we find the longest period of peace during the time of the judges.

At the end of this section, we read of one more judge who served at the end of this period, Shamgar. All we are told about him is that he attacked the Philistines (which would put him on the southwest side of the country). We are not even told how long he served as judge.

Lord willing, we will continue this topic in our next broadcast.

Let’s Pray —

***

Before we close, dear friend, I want to remind you that the most important thing you should know about the Bible is that it is the story of God working to save humanity from sin and the consequences of sin. He did this by sending His Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross for our sins and take the punishment that we deserve on Himself. Romans 5:8 says, “God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.”

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, and you want to get to know Him today, here’s how.

All you have to do is believe “that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; and that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the Scriptures” and you will be saved. The Bible states in the book of Romans 10:9, 13: “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

Pray and ask Him to come into your heart and He will.

Until next time, remember the word of God is the foundation to a successful life. God bless.

The Best of Times, the Worst of Times, Part 3 (Covenant and the Cross #110)

Welcome to the Covenant and the Cross Podcast. This is episode #110. I am your host, Daniel Whyte III, president of Gospel Light Society International. This podcast is designed to help you better understand the Word of God — both the Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament is the story of the Covenant which God made with His chosen people Israel. And the New Testament is the story of the Cross which signifies the fulfillment of the Old Covenant with Israel and the formation of a New Covenant with redeemed people from many nations.

We always like to start out with the Word of God, and today’s passage of Scripture is from Joshua 5:14-15 which reads: “And he said, Nay; but as captain of the host of the Lord am I now come. And Joshua fell on his face to the earth, and did worship, and said unto him, What saith my Lord unto his servant? And the captain of the Lord’s host said unto Joshua, Loose thy shoe from off thy foot; for the place whereon thou standest is holy. And Joshua did so.”

Regarding this passage, Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown wrote in their commentary: “The host of the Lord is either the Israelitish people, or the angels, or both included, and the Captain of it was the angel of the covenant, whose visible manifestations were varied according to the occasion. His attitude of equipment betokened his approval of, and interest in, the war of invasion. The adoption by Joshua of this absolute form of prostration demonstrates the sentiments of profound reverence with which the language and majestic bearing of the stranger inspired him. The real character of this personage was disclosed by His accepting the homage of worship, and still further in the command, “Loose thy shoe from off thy foot””

Today’s quote about the Bible is from Francis Chan. He said: “Don’t fall into the trap of studying the Bible without doing what it says.”

Our topic for today is titled “The Best of Times, the Worst of Times, Part 3” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

This entire section seems hard to follow because we don’t arrive at the cause of these problems until Joshua 2:6. The crucial verse is 2:10, which notes that the people served God only as long as Joshua’s generation was alive. As the new generation matured and took leadership, the people went after the false gods of the people of the land. However, we must recall that this was an overall condemnation not only of that generation, but of the generations to follow. The passage makes clear that each time God sent a judge, the people would return to God only for that judge’s lifetime. After the judge died, the people returned to their evil ways until God again sent hard times. The entire process was a downward spiral, with each generation worse than the previous one.

We also need to understand what the book means by “judges.” We tend to interpret the word in terms of judicial procedure: a judge is one who arbitrates legal issues. Some of the “judges” in this period (e.g., Deborah) did handle legal matters, but that was not their function within the context of this book. Rather, the focus was on their national service to bring the people back to God by intervening in times of foreign oppression. The judges themselves were people chosen by God for specific circumstances. They tended to work regionally (as opposed to nationally). Because of this, there seems to have been overlap, as shown in the chart on page 198. Each judge also seems to have been given specific gifts from God to accomplish his or her task. These differed with every judge, and only some of them were spectacular gifts, such as the ones we associate with Samson.

IDOLATRY IN ISRAEL
After Joshua died, the Israelites are said to have done “evil in the eyes of the LORD.” This phrase is used at least seven times throughout the book of Judges. The defining use is the first one in Judges 2:11–13, where the text reads, “The Israelites did evil in the eyes of the LORD. and served the Baals. They forsook the LORD, the God of their fathers, who had brought them out of Egypt. They followed and worshiped various gods of the peoples around them. They provoked the LORD. to anger because they forsook him and served Baal and the Ashtoreths.”

Lord willing, we will continue this topic in our next broadcast.

Let’s Pray —

***

Before we close, dear friend, I want to remind you that the most important thing you should know about the Bible is that it is the story of God working to save humanity from sin and the consequences of sin. He did this by sending His Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross for our sins and take the punishment that we deserve on Himself. Romans 5:8 says, “God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.”

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, and you want to get to know Him today, here’s how.

All you have to do is believe “that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; and that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the Scriptures” and you will be saved. The Bible states in the book of Romans 10:9, 13: “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

Pray and ask Him to come into your heart and He will.

Until next time, remember the word of God is the foundation to a successful life. God bless.

The Best of Times, the Worst of Times, Part 2 (Covenant and the Cross #109 with Daniel Whyte III)

Welcome to the Covenant and the Cross Podcast. This is episode #109. I am your host, Daniel Whyte III, president of Gospel Light Society International. This podcast is designed to help you better understand the Word of God — both the Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament is the story of the Covenant which God made with His chosen people Israel. And the New Testament is the story of the Cross which signifies the fulfillment of the Old Covenant with Israel and the formation of a New Covenant with redeemed people from many nations.

We always like to start out with the Word of God, and today’s passage of Scripture is from Joshua 5:10-13 which reads: “And the children of Israel encamped in Gilgal, and kept the passover on the fourteenth day of the month at even in the plains of Jericho. And they did eat of the old corn of the land on the morrow after the passover, unleavened cakes, and parched corn in the selfsame day. And the manna ceased on the morrow after they had eaten of the old corn of the land; neither had the children of Israel manna any more; but they did eat of the fruit of the land of Canaan that year.”

Regarding this passage, Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown wrote in their commentary: “The fourteenth day of the month was the time fixed by the law for solemn act of religious dedication during the Passover. And they did eat of the old corn of the land, found in storehouses of the inhabitants who had fled into Jericho. Parched corn is new grain in the fields. This abundance of food led to the discontinuance of the manna; and the fact of its then ceasing, viewed in connection with its seasonable appearance in the barren wilderness, is a striking proof of its miraculous origin.”

Today’s quote about the Bible is from Augustine of Hippo. He said: “The Holy Scriptures are our letters from home.”

Our topic for today is titled “The Best of Times, the Worst of Times, Part 2” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

The book of Judges makes it clear that we are now looking at the next generation. The arrangement of the narrative is both topical and chronological. The individual judges seem to be generally listed in sequential order, though with some overlap. However, the introductory section provides an overview of the entire period, and the final section relates two events that could have occurred at any time during that period.

Most of the material in the introductory overview reflects the difficulties of the nation rather than its successes. As such, it gives us just a few highlights. We are told of how Judah and Simeon did well in their conquests but could not take control of several areas because the inhabitants had iron chariots. The same was true of the other tribes, and specific unconquered cities throughout the nation are listed.

Then rather abruptly we are told of how the angel of the Lord appeared and condemned the people for failing to keep their part of the covenant. The key to this condemnation is Judges 2:2, “You shall not make a covenant with the people of this land, but you shall break down their altars.” The concept of a covenant with the Canaanites involved tolerating and eventually adopting their pagan religions. As a consequence, the inhabitants of the land would become a snare to the Israelites.

Lord willing, we will continue this topic in our next broadcast.

Let’s Pray —

***

Before we close, dear friend, I want to remind you that the most important thing you should know about the Bible is that it is the story of God working to save humanity from sin and the consequences of sin. He did this by sending His Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross for our sins and take the punishment that we deserve on Himself. Romans 5:8 says, “God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.”

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, and you want to get to know Him today, here’s how.

All you have to do is believe “that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; and that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the Scriptures” and you will be saved. The Bible states in the book of Romans 10:9, 13: “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

Pray and ask Him to come into your heart and He will.

Until next time, remember the word of God is the foundation to a successful life. God bless.

The Best of Times, the Worst of Times, Part 1 (The Covenant and the Cross #108)

Welcome to the Covenant and the Cross Podcast. This is episode #108. I am your host, Daniel Whyte III, president of Gospel Light Society International. This podcast is designed to help you better understand the Word of God — both the Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament is the story of the Covenant which God made with His chosen people Israel. And the New Testament is the story of the Cross which signifies the fulfillment of the Old Covenant with Israel and the formation of a New Covenant with redeemed people from many nations.

We always like to start out with the Word of God, and today’s passage of Scripture is from Joshua 5:9 which reads: “And the Lord said unto Joshua, This day have I rolled away the reproach of Egypt from off you. Wherefore the name of the place is called Gilgal unto this day.”

Regarding this passage, Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown wrote in their commentary: “The taunts industriously cast by that people upon Israel as nationally rejected by God by the cessation of circumcision and the renewal of that rite was a practical announcement of the restoration of the covenant. No trace either of the name or site of Gilgal is now to be found; but it was about two miles from Jericho according to Josephus, and well suited for an encampment by the advantages of shade and water. It was the first place pronounced “holy” in the Holy Land.”

Today’s quote about the Bible is from Søren Kierkegaard. He said: “The Bible is very easy to understand. But we Christians are a bunch of scheming swindlers. We pretend to be unable to understand it because we know very well that the minute we understand, we are obliged to act accordingly.”

Our topic for today is titled “The Best of Times, the Worst of Times, Part 1” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

Soon after occupying the land, many Israelites began adopting Canaanite practices. When they got into trouble and asked God for help, He sent judges to deliver them. The biblical writer mentions a number of them but covers three in some depth. The last section of the book of Judges relates two episodes that show how bad things had become. The story of Ruth, however, provides a positive contrast.

The book of Joshua ends with the nation finally settled in the land that had been promised. The time was about fifty years after leaving Egypt (including forty years in the desert, five years for the conquest, and then five years or so before Joshua gave his farewell). The book of Judges covers the period between the conquest and the decision on the part of the people to have a king (that is, approximately from 1400 to 1070 BC).

The book of Ruth takes place at the end of that period and serves as a bright counterpoint to the dark picture painted in Judges. In some ways, it shows how the system should have worked, while Judges shows what actually happened.

Lord willing, we will continue this topic in our next broadcast.

Let’s Pray —

***

Before we close, dear friend, I want to remind you that the most important thing you should know about the Bible is that it is the story of God working to save humanity from sin and the consequences of sin. He did this by sending His Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross for our sins and take the punishment that we deserve on Himself. Romans 5:8 says, “God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.”

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, and you want to get to know Him today, here’s how.

All you have to do is believe “that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; and that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the Scriptures” and you will be saved. The Bible states in the book of Romans 10:9, 13: “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

Pray and ask Him to come into your heart and He will.

Until next time, remember the word of God is the foundation to a successful life. God bless.

Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho — and Hazor Too, Part 12 (Covenant and the Cross #107)

Welcome to the Covenant and the Cross Podcast. This is episode #107. I am your host, Daniel Whyte III, president of Gospel Light Society International. This podcast is designed to help you better understand the Word of God — both the Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament is the story of the Covenant which God made with His chosen people Israel. And the New Testament is the story of the Cross which signifies the fulfillment of the Old Covenant with Israel and the formation of a New Covenant with redeemed people from many nations.

We always like to start out with the Word of God, and today’s passage of Scripture is from Joshua 5:8 which reads: “And it came to pass, when they had done circumcising all the people, that they abode in their places in the camp, till they were whole.”

Regarding this passage, Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown wrote in their commentary: “As the number of those born in the wilderness and uncircumcised must have been immense, a difficulty is apt to be felt how the rite could have been performed on such a multitude in so short a time. But it has been calculated that the proportion between those already circumcised (under twenty when the doom was pronounced) and those to be circumcised, was one to four, and consequently the whole ceremony could easily have been performed in a day. Circumcision being the sign and seal of the covenant, its performance was virtually an investment in the promised land, and its being delayed till their actual entrance into the country was a wise and gracious act on the part of God, who postponed this trying duty till the hearts of the people, animated by the recent astonishing miracle, were prepared to obey the divine will. It is calculated that, of those who did not need to be circumcised, more than fifty thousand were left to defend the camp if an attack had been then made upon it.”

Today’s quote about the Bible is from A.W. Tozer. He said: “The Word of God well understood and religiously obeyed is the shortest route to spiritual perfection. And we must not select a few favorite passages to the exclusion of others. Nothing less than a whole Bible can make a whole Christian.”

Our topic for today is titled “Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho — and Hazor Too (Part 12)” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

Sometime after this, Joshua called together the people to give a final farewell. Chapters 23 and 24 contain two speeches—one to the leaders and one to the people. In them, Joshua reminded the people of several things. First, he pointed out that God was the one who had brought them to the land and had given it to them. As part of the process, Joshua reminded them, they were living in houses they had not built and enjoying the produce from vineyards and olive trees they had not planted. Second, he made clear that they were not finished with the conquest, that there were many peoples yet to be driven out. Moreover, God would assist them in this process. Third, he reminded them that they had the law of God in the book of Moses to serve as a guide. The key guideline was that they were not to serve the gods of the people who had occupied the land before them. He noted that some of the Israelites were already serving those gods or were still clinging to the gods they had brought from Egypt. Joshua challenged the people to put away those foreign gods and to serve YHWH, the true God. However, as we will see, the people failed to do so. This behavior was to become a pattern that would plague the nation for the next thousand years.

After this final challenge, Joshua died at the age of 110. We are not given Joshua’s age throughout his career, so we are unable to determine the date of his death. He was likely at least as old as Caleb, who at the end of the conquest was 85. If so, that means Joshua died no later than 1375 BCE. However, based on the picture we see in the book of the Judges, which suggests that he was older than Caleb, it is likely that he died a few years earlier than that.

A significant point is that Joshua did not appoint a successor as mediator for the covenant. This set the stage for a period where the nation kept floundering—the subject of the next chapter.

Lord willing, we will continue this topic in our next broadcast.

Let’s Pray —

***

Before we close, dear friend, I want to remind you that the most important thing you should know about the Bible is that it is the story of God working to save humanity from sin and the consequences of sin. He did this by sending His Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross for our sins and take the punishment that we deserve on Himself. Romans 5:8 says, “God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.”

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, and you want to get to know Him today, here’s how.

All you have to do is believe “that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; and that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the Scriptures” and you will be saved. The Bible states in the book of Romans 10:9, 13: “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

Pray and ask Him to come into your heart and He will.

Until next time, remember the word of God is the foundation to a successful life. God bless.

Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho — and Hazor Too, Part 11 (The Covenant and the Cross #106)

Welcome to the Covenant and the Cross Podcast. This is episode #106. I am your host, Daniel Whyte III, president of Gospel Light Society International. This podcast is designed to help you better understand the Word of God — both the Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament is the story of the Covenant which God made with His chosen people Israel. And the New Testament is the story of the Cross which signifies the fulfillment of the Old Covenant with Israel and the formation of a New Covenant with redeemed people from many nations.

We always like to start out with the Word of God, and today’s passage of Scripture is from Joshua 5:3-7 which reads: “And Joshua made him sharp knives, and circumcised the children of Israel at the hill of the foreskins. And this is the cause why Joshua did circumcise: All the people that came out of Egypt, that were males, even all the men of war, died in the wilderness by the way, after they came out of Egypt. Now all the people that came out were circumcised: but all the people that were born in the wilderness by the way as they came forth out of Egypt, them they had not circumcised. For the children of Israel walked forty years in the wilderness, till all the people that were men of war, which came out of Egypt, were consumed, because they obeyed not the voice of the Lord: unto whom the Lord sware that he would not shew them the land, which the Lord sware unto their fathers that he would give us, a land that floweth with milk and honey. And their children, whom he raised up in their stead, them Joshua circumcised: for they were uncircumcised, because they had not circumcised them by the way.”

Regarding this passage, Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown wrote in their commentary: “The hill was probably one of the hills that form the highest terrace of the Jordan, on a rising ground at the palm forest. The omission to circumcise the children born in the wilderness might have been owing to the incessant movements of the people; but it is most generally thought that the true cause was a temporary suspension of the covenant with the unbelieving race who, being rejected of the Lord, were doomed to perish in the wilderness, and whose children had to bear the iniquity of their fathers, though, as the latter were to be brought into the promised land, the covenant would be renewed with them.”

Today’s quote about the Bible is from Kirk Cameron. He said: “Put your nose into the Bible everyday. It is your spiritual food.”

Our topic for today is titled “Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho — and Hazor Too (Part 11)” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

The next ten chapters give a detailed description of the division of the land, which was done by lot with God directing the outcome. While it might be a good exercise to find the boundary indicators on a map, many of the sites are uncertain. However, any good Bible atlas shows the basic outline of the various territories.

The Levites were not given a territory but were given specific cities throughout the entire region. Likewise, when the tribe of Simeon received its share, it was within a broader territory given to Judah. By the time of the united kingdom, the tribe of Simeon had been essentially absorbed by Judah. This fulfilled the prophecy given by Jacob in Genesis 49.

Two special allocations were made. The first was that of Caleb, one of the two spies who had expressed trust that God would give them the land. We find him now, forty-five years later, still exhibiting the same trust. As Judah was given its share, he asked for the city of Hebron as his portion of the inheritance because it was strong and fortified.

The other special allocation was given to the family of Zelophehad (ze-lo-fe-had) of the tribe of Manasseh, who had five daughters and no sons. When his daughters came and asked for an equal portion of the inheritance on behalf of their father, it was granted to them.

At this point, Joshua also designated the cities of refuge. These were Levitical towns set aside so that someone who had inadvertently committed a capital crime (e.g., manslaughter) could escape there and be protected until a trial had been conducted. If the crime was demonstrated to be inadvertent, the person could remain in the city of refuge until the high priest died.

With the division of the land, Joshua dismissed the Transjordanian tribes (Reuben, Gad, and half of Manasseh) about 1400 BCE.18 Their departure almost caused a civil war. When they got to the Jordan River, they decided to erect a monument in the form of a large altar. The rest of the tribes heard of it and understood it to be an altar that would take away from the tabernacle.

The Transjordanian tribes protested that they had not intended it for worship but as a memorial to remind their descendants of their loyalties to the people across the river. This response satisfied the rest of the tribes, and they departed in peace.

Lord willing, we will continue this topic in our next broadcast.

Let’s Pray —

***

Before we close, dear friend, I want to remind you that the most important thing you should know about the Bible is that it is the story of God working to save humanity from sin and the consequences of sin. He did this by sending His Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross for our sins and take the punishment that we deserve on Himself. Romans 5:8 says, “God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.”

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, and you want to get to know Him today, here’s how.

All you have to do is believe “that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; and that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the Scriptures” and you will be saved. The Bible states in the book of Romans 10:9, 13: “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

Pray and ask Him to come into your heart and He will.

Until next time, remember the word of God is the foundation to a successful life. God bless.

Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho — and Hazor Too, Part 10 (Covenant and the Cross #105)

This podcast is designed to help you better understand the Word of God — both the Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament is the story of the Covenant which God made with His chosen people Israel. And the New Testament is the story of the Cross which signifies the fulfillment of the Old Covenant with Israel and the formation of a New Covenant with redeemed people from many nations.

We always like to start out with the Word of God, and today’s passage of Scripture is from Joshua 5:2 which reads: “At that time the Lord said unto Joshua, Make thee sharp knives, and circumcise again the children of Israel the second time.”

Regarding this passage, Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown wrote in their commentary: “On the encampment being made after the passage, the Lord said unto Joshua collect stone knives and make them ready. Flints have been used in the early times of all people; and although the use of iron was known to the Hebrews in the days of Joshua, probably the want of a sufficient number of metallic implements dictated the employment of flints on this occasion. The text reads iterally, “return and circumcise.” The command did not require him to repeat the operation on those who had undergone it, but to resume the observance of the rite, which had been long discontinued. The language, however, evidently points to a general circumcising on some previous occasion, which, though unrecorded, must have been made before the celebration of the passover at Sinai, as a mixed multitude accompanied the camp. “The second time” of general circumcising was at the entrance into Canaan.”

Today’s quote about the Bible is from Billy Graham. He said: “I’ve read the last page of the Bible, it’s all going to turn out alright.”

Our topic for today is titled “Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho — and Hazor Too (Part 10)” from the book, “The Promise and the Blessing” by Dr. Michael A. Harbin.

Following these victories, Jabin, the king of Hazor, decided it was time to act and developed an alliance among the remaining forces in the region. These forces gathered at a location called the waters of Merom. The exact location of this site is not known, but given the use of chariots, the Jezreel Valley is very likely. This area would also make sense in terms of
tactics, since the goal was to destroy the Israelite camp at Gilgal in the Jordan River valley. However, the Israelites were able to attack the Canaanites first, and they scored a decisive victory. Joshua’s troops then pursued fleeing Canaanites as far as the Sidon area (about 70 to 100 kilometers, depending on the location of Merom). Hazor, the major city, was burned, and the rest of the cities captured.

With the conclusion of this campaign, the Israelites now had control of the land God had promised, as described in Joshua 12. The entire campaign appears to have taken about five years, for according to Joshua 14:10, Caleb observed that it had been forty-five years since he had performed his reconnaissance at Kadesh Barnea. Even after these successes, however, many Canaanites were still living in the land. When we get into the period of the judges, we will see that God had several reasons for allowing this situation. First, the population of the Israelites was not large enough to completely resettle the land from the tribes they were displacing. Second, the delay would be a test of the faith and faithfulness of subsequent generations. A third reason was to allow the people who had participated in the conquest to this point the opportunity to enjoy the land they had conquered. Another possibility, although it is never overtly expressed, may have been to allow the Canaanites an opportunity to turn to Israel’s God and to become part of that people (like the Gibeonites).

Lord willing, we will continue this topic in our next broadcast.

Let’s Pray —

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Before we close, dear friend, I want to remind you that the most important thing you should know about the Bible is that it is the story of God working to save humanity from sin and the consequences of sin. He did this by sending His Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross for our sins and take the punishment that we deserve on Himself. Romans 5:8 says, “God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.”

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, and you want to get to know Him today, here’s how.

All you have to do is believe “that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; and that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the Scriptures” and you will be saved. The Bible states in the book of Romans 10:9, 13: “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

Pray and ask Him to come into your heart and He will.

Until next time, remember the word of God is the foundation to a successful life. God bless.